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Monthly Archives: October 2008

Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco

While continuing his tradition of photographing great authors such as Pulitzer Prize winner Carol Shields, Leonard Cohen, Farley Mowat, Rino Noto had the pleasure of photographing world renowned author, professor and philosopher Umberto Eco.  Umberto Eco is known globally for his hugely successful novels The Name of the Rose and Foucault’s Pendulum, which critics have called “the thinking man’s DaVinci Code”.

Recently, an exclusive dinner was hosted by Martin Stiglio of the Italian Cultural Institute of Canada.   The dinner was held in honour of Umberto Eco at Roberto Martella’s iconic restaurant Grano.  Rino took the opportunity to set up a mini studio in the giardino and captured stunning portraits of professor and author Umberto Eco, actor Toni Nardi, director Jerry Ciccoritti, and author Antonio Nicaso (who has written over 7 books on the subject of organized crime), amongst others.

Rino is planning to exhibit this profound series in a show during the spring of 2009, followed by possible publication in a book, which fans of this portrait series can purchase for their personal collection.

Tony Nardi

Tony Nardi

Jerry Ciccoritti

Jerry Ciccoritti

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Rino Noto was recently profiled in the summer 2008 issue of PhotoNews Magazine.  With his fibre-optic portrait gracing the cover, Sandy Kay, writer for PhotoNews, had the following to say in her article:

“Rino Noto is, mainly, a fashion and portrait photographer. He is a soft-spoken but quietly intense man who observes and, seemingly, enjoys all that is around him. He has been taking photographs since he was about thirteen years old when he would take off for hours on his bicycle with a borrowed camera.  “It was always someone else’s”, he says. By 1981, he had his own studio… and his own camera.  He says that, these days, 90 percent of his shooting is done in his studio – and what a studio it is. When you walk into the cavernous main room, the first thing that you notice is the wall towards which he aims his camera. The wall has a gently sloping curve that seamlessly joins it to the floor. It is a curve made of fiberglass that is embedded into the wall. The seamless room makes for seamless images.

Most of Rino’s lighting accessories are broncolor but Rino has, on occasion, had to “Frankenstein” his own creations to get the effect that he envisions. Some of Rino’s creations are now actual broncolor accessories after Rino showed them to Claude Bron.

When Rino is photographing people, he is trying to “see something, bring something out that … maybe somebody else doesn’t see”.  Rino is fastidious in his work but not mechanical. “It’s all about light”.  “There is that brief moment of trust. A moment where the defences, the masks come down” he recalls. “Sometimes it’s easy, sometimes it’s magic.”

He has been published in worldwide magazines and has been sought by some of the best known brands such as Levis, Jockey underwear, Molson and American Express. In Zoom magazine, his work is described as “saturated colors with vital force”. He has also been published on the cover of La Fotographia Actual from Spain and has been featured on two different television shows: “Behind the Camera” and “Behind the Lens”. Both have been shown in Europe and “Behind the Camera” will be shown on Discovery and Bravo in Canada in the near future.

With all of the accolades that he has received – he has been called “The Master” by some – you might think that he would have an ego of some sort. This is not the case. Rino has no ego, no airs. He is thoughtful and gentle and he loves what he does. “I have the best job”, he says with a grin.” – Sandy Kay, PhotoNews Magazine, 2008

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